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dc.contributor.author Peter W. en_US
dc.contributor.author M. H. en_US
dc.contributor.author B. en_US
dc.contributor.author A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-17T16:57:15Z
dc.date.available 2008-12-17T16:57:15Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1191/0309133306pp493ra en_US
dc.identifier.citation Abrahams , P W , Follansbee , M H , Smith , B & Hunt , A 2006 , ' Soil, geography and human disease: a critical review of the importance of medical cartography ' Progress in Physical Geography , vol 30 , no. 4 , pp. 490-512 . , 10.1191/0309133306pp493ra en_US
dc.identifier.other PURE: 96642 en_US
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/1763 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/1763
dc.description.abstract Soils have a profound impact on the causation and geographical distribution of human disease and well-being. However, because of the multifactorial causes of illnesses, the impact of soils on health needs to be considered in light of the environment in its fullest sense. Since the nineteenth century, medical cartography has served as an epidemiological tool for investigating the links between soils and human well-being. Using examples, particularly the problems of soil-transmitted helminth infections, and iodine and selenium deficiency diseases, this paper shows how maps have been used to identify problem areas, stimulate the development of aetiological hypotheses, help in the planning and management of public health problems, and assess the impact of any beneficial strategies. en_US
dc.format.extent 23 en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Progress in Physical Geography en_US
dc.title Soil, geography and human disease: a critical review of the importance of medical cartography en_US
dc.contributor.pbl Institute of Geography & Earth Sciences en_US
dc.contributor.pbl Other IGES Research en_US


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