Information seeking and mediated searching Part 4: Cognitive styles in information seeking

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dc.contributor.author Ellis, David
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Tom
dc.contributor.author Foster, Allen
dc.contributor.author Ford, Nigel
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-18T12:19:22Z
dc.date.available 2008-12-18T12:19:22Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.citation Ellis , D , Wilson , T , Foster , A & Ford , N 2002 , ' Information seeking and mediated searching Part 4: Cognitive styles in information seeking ' Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology , vol 53 , no. 9 , pp. 728-735 . , 10.1002/asi.10084 en
dc.identifier.issn 1532-2890
dc.identifier.other PURE: 97666
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/1799
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/1799
dc.description Ellis, David, Ford, Nigel, Wilson, Tom, Foster, Allen, (2002) 'Information seeking and mediated searching Part 4: Cognitive styles in information seeking', Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 53(9) pp.728-735 RAE2008 en
dc.description.abstract This is the fourth in a series resulting from a joint research project directed by Professor Tom Wilson in the United Kingdom and Dr. Amanda Spink in the United States. The analysis reported here sought to test a number of hypotheses linking global/analytic cognitive styles and aspects of researchers' problem-solving and related information-seeking behavior. One hundred and eleven postdoctoral researchers were assessed for Witkin's field dependence/independence using Riding's Cognitive Styles Analysis and for Pask's holist/serialist biases using items from Ford's Study Processes Questionnaire. These measures were correlated with the researchers' perceptions of aspects of their problem-solving and information-seeking behavior, and with those of the search intermediary who performed literature searches on their behalf. A number of statistically significant correlations were found. Field-independent researchers were more analytic and active than their field-dependent counterparts. Holists engaged more in exploratory and serendipitous behavior, and were more idiosyncratic in their communication than serialists. en
dc.format.extent 8 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology en
dc.title Information seeking and mediated searching Part 4: Cognitive styles in information seeking en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Article (Journal) en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.10084
dc.contributor.institution Department of Information Studies en
dc.contributor.institution Information Behaviour and e-learning en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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