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dc.contributor.advisor Doust, Jonathan H. en
dc.contributor.advisor Thatcher, Joanne en
dc.contributor.author Rahman, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned 2009-01-12T16:48:06Z
dc.date.available 2009-01-12T16:48:06Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Rahman, Rachel, 'A Test of Self-Determination Theory in Exercise Rehabilitation', 2008. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/1823
dc.description.abstract The aim of this thesis was to test the use of Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985a) in predicting adherence to and psychological outcomes in supervised exercise rehabilitation. The research focused on a G.P. referral (Exercise for Life; EFL; n=293) and a Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR; n=329) programme based in a rural community in West Wales. The first study compared the predictive patterns of psychological need satisfaction on motivation orientation to exercise using pre, post and scheme change data of a primary prevention programme (EFL) and a secondary prevention programme (CR). This exploratory study was then developed to test a model of SDT using adherence and psychological variables such as anxiety, depression and health related quality of life as outcomes in the model (n=119, 36.9% male, 63.1% female, mean age 54.81 ± 12.91 years). Finally a psychological instrument was designed to conduct preliminary investigation into the existence of the concept of relative need with regards to exercise motivation (n=94, 43% male, 57% female, mean age 59.5 years ± 8.74). en
dc.description.sponsorship The Big Lottery Fund - Ceredigion Exercise Sceme en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Aberystwyth University en
dc.subject Exercise Rehabilitation en
dc.title A Test of Self-Determination Theory in Exercise Rehabilitation. en
dc.type Text en
dc.publisher.department Department of Sport and Exercise Science en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en
dc.type.publicationtype doctoral thesis en


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