Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Foster, Allen
dc.contributor.author Ford, Nigel
dc.date.accessioned 2007-01-12T12:17:26Z
dc.date.available 2007-01-12T12:17:26Z
dc.date.issued 2007-01-12
dc.identifier.citation Foster , A & Ford , N 2007 , ' Serendipity and Information Seeking ' Foster , pp. 321-340 . en
dc.identifier.other PURE: 80302
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/292
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/292
dc.description Foster, A.E. & Ford, N.J. (2003). Serendipity and information seeking: an empirical study. Journal of Documentation, 59(3), 321-340. en
dc.description.abstract ¿Serendipity¿ has both a classical origin in literature and a more modern manifestation where it is found in the descriptions of the problem-solving and knowledge acquisition of humanities and science scholars. Studies of information retrieval and information seeking have also discussed the utility of the notion of serendipity. Some have implied that it may be stimulated, or that certain people may ¿encounter¿ serendipitous information more than others. All to some extent accept the classical definition of serendipity as a ¿fortuitous¿ accident. The analysis presented here is part of a larger study concerning the information seeking behaviour of interdisciplinary scholars. This paper considers the nature of serendipity in information seeking contexts, and reinterprets the notion of serendipity as a phenomenon arising from both conditions and strategies ¿ as both a purposive and a non-purposive component of information seeking and related knowledge acquisition. en
dc.format.extent 20 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Foster en
dc.title Serendipity and Information Seeking en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Article (Journal) en
dc.contributor.institution Department of Information Studies en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


Files in this item

Aside from theses and in the absence of a specific licence document on an item page, all works in Cadair are accessible under the CC BY-NC-ND Licence. AU theses and dissertations held on Cadair are made available for the purposes of private study and non-commercial research and brief extracts may be reproduced under fair dealing for the purpose of criticism or review. If you have any queries in relation to the re-use of material on Cadair, contact is@aber.ac.uk.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Cadair


Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics