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dc.contributor.author McIntyre, James
dc.contributor.author Labrosse, Frédéric
dc.contributor.author Church, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-16T10:00:02Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-16T10:00:02Z
dc.date.issued 2009-10-16
dc.identifier.citation McIntyre , J , Labrosse , F & Church , A 2009 , ' Efficient image-based tracking of apparently changing moving targets ' . en
dc.identifier.other PURE: 133659
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/3225
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/3225
dc.description James McIntyre, Andrew Church and Frédéric Labrosse. Efficient image-based tracking of apparently changing moving targets. In Proceedings of Towards Autonomous Robotic Systems, University of Ulster, UK, 2009. en
dc.description.abstract In this paper, we present an efficient way of representing and tracking a moving object in images. In our approach, the object is visually represented as a set of pixels corresponding to an ideal view of the object as seen by a camera. As the object moves, its appearance can change in a number of ways, depending on the application. In this paper, we present two applications: leader-follower formation and visual guidance from a 'camera in the sky'. In these two applications, the object translates in the column and row directions of the images as well as, respectively, changes in size and orientation. However, other transformations, such as skewing and shearing, could be used in the proposed framework. We present results of real experiments performed in our Lab and show that even on low specification computers, the method performs well and fast enough. en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title Efficient image-based tracking of apparently changing moving targets en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Conference paper en
dc.contributor.institution Department of Computer Science en
dc.description.status Non peer reviewed en


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