Second World War Japanese Atrocoties and British Minor War Crimes Trials: the Issue of Fair Trial in Four Selected British Minor War Crimes Trials in Malaya and Singapore in 1946-1947

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dc.contributor.advisor Harding, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Narayanan, Arujunan
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-22T15:52:21Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-22T15:52:21Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation Narayanan, Arujunan, (2003) 'Second World War Japanese Atrocoties and British Minor War Crimes Trials: the Issue of Fair Trial in Four Selected British Minor War Crimes Trials in Malaya and Singapore in 1946-1947, Department of Law, Aberystwyth University en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/3277
dc.description.abstract Following the end of the Second World War, the British military conducted hundreds of minor war crimes trials in the Far East in which hundreds of Japanese war criminals were tried and punished. There were mixed opinions about these trials. The few scholars who studied some of them held view that generally the trials were fair trials. However, some Japanese war criminals hold the view that they were victors' trials, in which only ordinary soldiers used as pawns for the crimes of senior officers. Some of the victims held the view that the British war crimes authorities were inefficient, the war crimes courts were lenient and the sentences were heavy if the victims were Whites and light if they happened to be Asians. This research evaluated the above opinions and the fairness of four important trials - the Gozawa Sadaichi and Nine Others, the Penang Kempetai, the Double Tenth and the Singapore Chinese Massacre Trials. The result shows that some of the views were not true or only valid in certain aspects. The Gozawa Sadaichi and Nine Others Trial was a fair trial but with the main criticism that the accused were convicted on affidavit evidence and those who gave the affidavits were not available in the court for the Defence's cross-examination. The Penang Kempetai Trial and the Double Tenth Trial could be models of fair trials. The Singapore Chinese Massacre Trial while satisfying most of the criteria of a fair trial, suffer from some unfairness in relation to the death sentences given to Lieutenant-General Kawamura Saburo and Colonel Oishi Masayuki. On the whole, the research has highlighted the quality of justice rendered in these trials. The research also highlights some of the legal issues involved in the Japanese atrocities and British minor war crimes trials en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Aberystwyth University en
dc.title Second World War Japanese Atrocoties and British Minor War Crimes Trials: the Issue of Fair Trial in Four Selected British Minor War Crimes Trials in Malaya and Singapore in 1946-1947 en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype doctoral thesis en


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