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dc.contributor.author Christos en_US
dc.contributor.author Francisco en_US
dc.contributor.author Vito en_US
dc.contributor.author Elio en_US
dc.contributor.editor George en_US
dc.contributor.editor István en_US
dc.contributor.editor Eörs en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-07T16:56:59Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-07T16:56:59Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21283-3_26 en_US
dc.identifier 978-3-642-21282-6 en_US
dc.identifier 978-3-642-21283-3 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Ampatzis , C , Santos , F , Trianni , V & Tuci , E 2009 , ' To grip, or not to grip: Evolving coordination in autonomous robots ' . in G Kampis , I Karsai & E Szathmáry (eds) , Advances in Artificial Life. Darwin Meets von Neumann : 10th European Conference, ECAL 2009, Budapest, Hungary, September 13-16, 2009, Revised Selected Papers, Part I . vol. 5777 , Lecture Notes in Computer Science , vol. 5777 , Springer Science+Business Media , pp. 205-212 , 10th European Conference, ECAL , Budapest , Hungary , 13-16 September . , 10.1007/978-3-642-21283-3_26 en_US
dc.identifier.citation conference en_US
dc.identifier.other PURE: 1753659 en_US
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/5412 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/5412
dc.description.abstract In evolutionary robotics, as in the animal world, performing a task which is beneficial to the entire group demands the coordination of different individuals. Whenever time-dependent dynamic allocation of roles is needed and individual roles are not pre-defined, coordination can often be hard to achieve. In this paper, we study the evolution of role allocation and self-assembling strategies in a group of two homogeneous robots.We show how robot coordination and individual choices (who will grip whom) can be successfully restated in terms of anti-coordination problems, showing how conventional game theoretical tools can be used in the interpretation and design of evolutionary outcomes in collective robotics. Moreover, we highlight and discuss striking similarities between the way our physical robots allocate roles and the way animals solve conflicts. Arguably, these similarities suggest that evolutionary robotics may offer apart from automatic controller design for autonomous robots a viable alternative for the study of biological phenomena.;In evolutionary robotics, as in the animal world, performing a task which is beneficial to the entire group demands the coordination of different individuals. Whenever time-dependent dynamic allocation of roles is needed and individual roles are not pre-defined, coordination can often be hard to achieve. In this paper, we study the evolution of role allocation and self-assembling strategies in a group of two homogeneous robots.We show how robot coordination and individual choices (who will grip whom) can be successfully restated in terms of anti-coordination problems, showing how conventional game theoretical tools can be used in the interpretation and design of evolutionary outcomes in collective robotics. Moreover, we highlight and discuss striking similarities between the way our physical robots allocate roles and the way animals solve conflicts. Arguably, these similarities suggest that evolutionary robotics may offer apart from automatic controller design for autonomous robots a viable alternative for the study of biological phenomena. en_US
dc.publisher Springer Science+Business Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Advances in Artificial Life. Darwin Meets von Neumann en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Lecture Notes in Computer Science en_US
dc.subject anti-coordination game en_US
dc.subject evolutionary robotics en_US
dc.subject collective behavior en_US
dc.subject evolutionary game theory en_US
dc.title To grip, or not to grip: Evolving coordination in autonomous robots en_US
dc.contributor.pbl Department of Computer Science en_US
dc.contributor.pbl Intelligent Robotics Group en_US


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