Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Barnes, Dave
dc.contributor.author Pugh, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-29T09:07:03Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-29T09:07:03Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04
dc.identifier.citation Pugh. S, Autonomous Science For Future Planetary Exploration Operations, PhD Thesis, Aberystwyth University, 2010 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/5722
dc.description.abstract A major mission driver for space exploration is to maximise science data return whilst minimising ground-based human intervention and hence associated operations costs. Future robotic exploration such as the ESA ExoMars mission (launch 2018), and the eventual Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission will require rovers to travel further and faster than has been achieved to date. In order to make this possible it is essential that currently earth bound decisions be transferred to the exploration platform wherever possible. In line with this, this Thesis presents a new solution which requires a combined on-Earth and on-board rover approach. The on-board element utilises autonomy and basic image processing techniques to image a predefined number of potential targets. The Earth-based element uses a more complex knowledge based system approach which has been primed by a human Planetary Geology Expert. This Earth based approach, which is used to process the autonomously captured images, is presented as a precursor to a future onboard solution. Both solution elements represent significant advances in the current state of the art. This Thesis provides details of the design, implementation and experimentation undertaken to validate the performance of both the on-board and on-Earth solution elements. en
dc.description.sponsorship STFC en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Aberystwyth University en
dc.relation.isreferencedby http://users.aber.ac.uk/dpb/Space_Robotics/Space_Robotics.html en
dc.title Autonomous Science For Future Planetary Exploration Operations en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.qualificationlevel doctoral
dc.type.publicationtype doctoral thesis en


Files in this item

Aside from theses and in the absence of a specific licence document on an item page, all works in Cadair are accessible under the CC BY-NC-ND Licence. AU theses and dissertations held on Cadair are made available for the purposes of private study and non-commercial research and brief extracts may be reproduced under fair dealing for the purpose of criticism or review. If you have any queries in relation to the re-use of material on Cadair, contact is@aber.ac.uk.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Cadair


Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics