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dc.contributor.author Cox, Noel
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-29T14:38:16Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-29T14:38:16Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-29
dc.identifier.citation Cox , N 2010 , ' Property law, imperial and British titles: The Duke of Marlborough and the Principality of Mindelheim ' Unknown Journal , pp. 191-210 . en
dc.identifier.other PURE: 160476
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/5733
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/5733
dc.description Cox, Noel, ¿Property law, imperial and British titles: The Duke of Marlborough and the Principality of Mindelheim¿, The Legal History Review/Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis/Revue d'Histoire du Droit, (2009) 77 (1), pp. 191-210 en
dc.description.abstract The title of prince of the Holy Roman Empire was conferred in 1704 upon all the children heirs and lawful descendants, male and female, of John Churchill, the first duke of Marlborough. The title of prince of Mindelheim was granted in 1705 to all male descendants and daughters of the first duke. But following the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 and the Treaty of Rastatt in 1714 the principality passed to Bavaria. The right of the dukes of Marlborough to use the style and title was thus lost, and any residual rights would have expired in 1722 on the death of the duke, as they could not pass to a daughter (unlike his British titles). Despite this it is still common practice to describe the Duke of Marlborough as a Prince of the Holy Roman Empire and Prince of Mindelheim. This paper considers the differences in the treatment of the descent of the British and imperial titles. en
dc.format.extent 20 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Unknown Journal en
dc.title Property law, imperial and British titles: The Duke of Marlborough and the Principality of Mindelheim en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Article (Journal) en
dc.contributor.institution Department of Law & Criminology en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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