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dc.contributor.author Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M.
dc.contributor.author Hoffmann, Karl F.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-10-12T09:14:44Z
dc.date.available 2010-10-12T09:14:44Z
dc.date.issued 2010-10-12
dc.identifier.citation Fitzpatrick , J M & Hoffmann , K F 2010 , ' Gene Expression Studies Using Self-Fabricated Parasite cDNA Microarrays ' . in : in S. Melville (ed) Methods in Molecular Biology . Humana Press Inc , pp. 219-236 . en
dc.identifier.other PURE: 161167
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/5783
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/5783
dc.description Hoffmann, K. F., Fitzpatrick, J. M. (2004). Gene Expression Studies Using Self-Fabricated Parasite cDNA Microarrays, in S. Melville (ed) Methods in Molecular Biology, Vol. 270: Parasite Genomics Protocols. Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ. pp. 219-236 en
dc.description.abstract DNA microarray platforms represent a functional genomics technology that uses structured information obtained from genomic sequencing efforts as a means to study transcriptional processes in a systematic and high-throughput manner. Specifically in this chapter, we outline the ordered processes involved in large-scale parasite gene expression studies including complementary (cDNA) microarray fabrication, total RNA isolation, cDNA labeling using fluorochromes, and DNA:DNA hybridization. Methods described herein were adapted for the study of schistosome sexual maturation and developmental biology but could be easily modified for the study of any additional parasitological system. en
dc.format.extent 18 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Humana Press Inc
dc.relation.ispartof in S. Melville (ed) Methods in Molecular Biology en
dc.title Gene Expression Studies Using Self-Fabricated Parasite cDNA Microarrays en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Book chapter en
dc.contributor.institution Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences en


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