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dc.contributor.author Yamada, Toshihiko
dc.contributor.author Skøt, Leif
dc.contributor.editor Huyghe, C.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-01T08:45:44Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-01T08:45:44Z
dc.date.issued 2011-06-01
dc.identifier.citation Yamada , T & Skøt , L 2011 , ' Allelic diversity for candidate genes and association studies: methods and results ' . C Huyghe (ed.) , in : Sustainable use of Genetic Diversity in Forage and Turf Breeding . Springer Netherlands , pp. 391-396 . en
dc.identifier.isbn 9789048187058
dc.identifier.other PURE: 175052
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/6855
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/6855
dc.description Yamada, T., Skøt, L. (2010). 'Allelic diversity for candidate genes and association studies: methods and results', In: Sustainable use of Genetic Diversity in Forage and Turf Breeding, (Eds) Huyghe, C., Chapter 56, (Part 5), 391-396. en
dc.description.abstract The increasing ease with which molecular markers can be generated makes it possible for plant geneticists to use these genomic technologies for better exploitation of the available genetic variation in breeding populations. Identifying markers based on conventional bi-parental mapping populations is most likely not the best way to implement a marker assisted selection (MAS) program, although this approach is useful for introgression of alleles from wild germplasm. Instead, association mapping may be used in a more practical approach, by measuring both phenotypes and markers directly on the plants in the breeding nursery. Conventional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping enables one to identify chromosomal regions of 5¿20 cM containing genes underlying the trait of interest. However, that still leaves several hundred potential candidate genes. Association mapping enables the exploitation of the wider genetic diversity and incorporate a larger number of recombinations. Synthetic populations used for genetic improvement of self-incompatible crops including many forage and turf species, present a useful tool for incorporating association mapping and genotype building using molecular markers. This is particularly true for traits that have not previously been selected for, since linkage disequilibrium (LD) is less likely to have been built up. We show some preliminary data from a experiment to illustrate population structure, LD and associations with candidate genes in synthetic populations not previously selected for this trait. Some recent research on association analysis in perennial ryegrass and clovers are also reviewed. We also briefly describe genomic selection (GS) that can predict the breeding values of lines in a population by analyzing phenotypes and high-density marker scores as a way to incorporate MAS into the breeding process. en
dc.format.extent 6 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer Netherlands
dc.relation.ispartof Sustainable use of Genetic Diversity in Forage and Turf Breeding en
dc.title Allelic diversity for candidate genes and association studies: methods and results en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Book chapter en
dc.contributor.institution Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences en


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