Natural faecal fluorophores and the potential of chlorophyll based markers to optimise fluorescence as a real-time solution for the detection of faecal contamination on carcasses

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dc.contributor.author Lee, M. R. F.
dc.contributor.author Theobald, V. J.
dc.contributor.author Ougham, H. J.
dc.contributor.author Veberg Dahl, A.
dc.contributor.author Lundby, F.
dc.contributor.author Scollan, N. D.
dc.contributor.author Wold, J-P.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-06T11:31:26Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-06T11:31:26Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08-16
dc.identifier.citation Lee , M R F , Theobald , V J , Ougham , H J , Veberg Dahl , A , Lundby , F , Scollan , N D & Wold , J-P 2010 , ' Natural faecal fluorophores and the potential of chlorophyll based markers to optimise fluorescence as a real-time solution for the detection of faecal contamination on carcasses ' Meat Science , vol 86 , no. 4 , pp. 966-975 . en
dc.identifier.issn 0309-1740
dc.identifier.other PURE: 163946
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/6930
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/6930
dc.description Sponsorship: BBSRC IMPF: 02.61 RONO: 0006624 en
dc.description.abstract More accurate and sensitive visualisation of faecal contamination in the abattoir would significantly reduce the risk posed by harbouring pathogenic micro-organisms. We carried out a preliminary investigation of the range of fluorophores found naturally in faeces from typical ruminant diets. Sixteen ewes were offered either: i) fresh forage (FF), ii) grass silage (GS), iii) grass hay (GH) or iv) concentrate and barley straw (CB). Animals offered FF diets had a greater concentration (P <0.001) of chlorophyll based compounds in their faeces and subsequent fluorescent emission spectra. In a second experiment we investigated a range of fluorescent markers against a basal concentrate and barley straw diet. Ten Cheviot sheep were split into five treatment groups during a duplicate 5 × 5 Latin square design. Four of the groups received a chlorophyll based marker at a rate of 2 g/d: i) Mg–Chlorophyllin (MgC), ii) Fe–Chlorophyllin (FeC), iii) Zn–Chlorophyllin (ZnC) or iv) Spirulina (Chlorophyll a extract from blue green algae, Sp). The last group received no supplement as the control (Con). The appearance of chlorophyllin markers and their derivatives in faeces was similar with mean concentrations of 3.1 and 7.2 μg/g DM, respectively. The most intense fluorescent signal was shown with MgC followed by ZnC, FeC, Sp and Con at 685 nm. The use of markers in pre-slaughter diets would improve the accuracy of faecal detection as a result of greater fluorescence and specific emission wavelengths which do not overlap with natural meat components to help with visualisation. en
dc.format.extent 10 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Meat Science en
dc.subject VerifEYE en
dc.subject Faecal contamination en
dc.subject Fluorescence en
dc.subject Chlorophyll en
dc.subject HACCP en
dc.title Natural faecal fluorophores and the potential of chlorophyll based markers to optimise fluorescence as a real-time solution for the detection of faecal contamination on carcasses en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Article (Journal) en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2010.08.002
dc.contributor.institution Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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