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dc.contributor.author Williams, Howard
dc.date.accessioned 2008-11-05T17:05:55Z
dc.date.available 2008-11-05T17:05:55Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Williams , H 2006 , ' Ludwig Feuerbach's Critique of Religion and the End of Moral Philosophy ' . in The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School . Cambridge University Press , pp. 50-66 . en
dc.identifier.isbn 0-521-85497-0
dc.identifier.other PURE: 81142
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/828
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/828
dc.identifier.uri http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521854970 en
dc.description Williams, H. (2006). Ludwig Feuerbach's Critique of Religion and the End of Moral Philosophy. In Moggach, D. (Ed.), The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School (pp.50-66). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Introduction; Part I. Eduard Gans: 1. Eduard Gans on poverty and on the constitutional debate; 2. Ludwig Feuerbach's Critique of Religion and the end of moral philosophy; Part II. Ludwig Feuerbach: 3. The symbolic dimension and the politics of Left Hegelianism; Part III. Bruno Bauer: 4. Exclusiveness and political universalism in Bruno Bauer; 5. Republican rigorism and emancipation in Bruno Bauer; Part IV. Edgar Bauer: 6. Edgar Bauer and The Origins of the Theory of Terrorism; Max Stirner 7. Ein Menschenleben: Hegel and Stirner; 8. 'The State and I': Max Stirner's anarchism; Friedrich Engels: 9. Engels and the invention of the catastrophist conception of the industrial revolution; Karl Marx: 10. The basis of the state in the Marx of 1842; 11. Marx and Feuerbachian essence: returning to the question of 'Human Essence' in historical materialism; 12. Freedom and the 'Realm of Necessity'; Concluding with Hegel :13. Work, language and community: a response to Hegel's critics. RAE2008 en
dc.description.abstract The period leading up to the Revolutions of 1848 was a seminal moment in the history of political thought, demarcating the ideological currents and defining the problems of freedom and social cohesion which are among the key issues of modern politics. This anthology offers new research on Hegel’s followers in the 1830s and 1840s. With essays by philosophers, political scientists, and historians from Europe and North America, it pays special attention to questions of state power, the economy, poverty, and labour, as well as to ideas on freedom. The book examines the political and social thought of Edouard Gans, Ludwig Feuerbach, Max Stirner, Bruno and Edgar Bauer, the young Engels, and Marx. It places them in the context of Hegel’s philosophy, the Enlightenment, Kant, the French Revolution, industrialisation, and urban poverty. It also views Marx and Engels in relation to their contemporaries and interlocutors in the Hegelian school. en
dc.format.extent 17 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartof The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School en
dc.title Ludwig Feuerbach's Critique of Religion and the End of Moral Philosophy en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Book chapter en
dc.contributor.institution Department of International Politics en


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