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dc.contributor.author Maddrell, Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2008-11-10T10:18:20Z
dc.date.available 2008-11-10T10:18:20Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Maddrell , P 2005 , ' What we have discovered about the Cold War is what we already knew: Julius Mader and Western Espionage during the Cold War ' Cold War History , vol 5 , no. 2 , pp. 235-258 . , 10.1080/14682740500062127 en
dc.identifier.issn 1743-7962
dc.identifier.other PURE: 80580
dc.identifier.other dspace: 2160/968
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/968
dc.identifier.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14682740500062127 en
dc.description Maddrell, John, 'What we have discovered about the Cold War is what we already knew: Julius Mader and Western Espionage during the Cold War', Cold War History (2005) 5(2) pp.235-258 RAE2008 en
dc.description.abstract Throughout the Cold War East German propagandists churned out books and articles denouncing the West. One, Julius Mader by name, was particularly active in claiming to expose the aims, methods and organizers of Western espionage. More than five million copies of his books were sold, chiefly in Soviet Bloc countries. If his information were true, it had to come from East Germany's Ministry of State Security (MfS, or 'Stasi'). To date, despite the scarcity of primary source material on espionage during the Cold War, Mader's status as a Communist propagandist has meant that his works have been little used by Western historians. However, by consulting the MfS' records it is now possible to find out whether or not his allegations were true. If they were, the MfS blew significant holes in the secrecy of Western espionage for decades, starting more than 40 years ago, and Western historians have been very neglectful in not referring much more to Mader's books. Many of his allegations were indeed true and his works, though very obviously products of an ideology, represent a valuable resource for the historians of today. Moreover, they show that during the Cold War the Communist regimes were talking more sense than we thought and were telling us much that our own governments did not want us to hear. The Cold War over, we surely have a right to know what secret activities the Western governments undertook during their struggle with the Communist Bloc and should make use of every reliable source. en
dc.format.extent 24 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Cold War History en
dc.title What we have discovered about the Cold War is what we already knew: Julius Mader and Western Espionage during the Cold War en
dc.type Text en
dc.type.publicationtype Article (Journal) en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14682740500062127
dc.contributor.institution Aberystwyth University en
dc.contributor.institution Department of International Politics en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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