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dc.contributor.author Edkins, Jenny
dc.contributor.editor Edkins, Jenny
dc.contributor.editor Kear, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned 2013-11-22T21:09:17Z
dc.date.available 2013-11-22T21:09:17Z
dc.date.issued 2013-11-05
dc.identifier.citation Edkins , J 2013 , Facing and Defacing . in J Edkins & A Kear (eds) , International Politics and Performance : Critical Aesthetics and Creative Practice . Interventions , Taylor & Francis , London , pp. 40-59 . en
dc.identifier.isbn 9780415706223
dc.identifier.isbn 9781315884004
dc.identifier.isbn 9781134664535
dc.identifier.other PURE: 890737
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 1155334f-94b8-43b4-8064-24bb4d1e56e6
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84925812324
dc.identifier.other handle.net: 2160/12807
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/12807
dc.description.abstract The chapter begins with an examination of images of the face captured by police during the English riots of 2011, when the Assistant Chief Constable of Greater Manchester commented “we have your face…we are coming to get you.” As Deleuze and Guattari note “you’ve been recognised, the abstract machine has you inscribed in its overall grip… [it] rejects faces that do not conform or seem suspicious.” Face recognition technology appears to provide potentialities for surveillance and identification: the face in the street can be connected through Facebook profiles to credit ratings and more. However, these expectations do not materialise in practice, as Kelly Gates has shown, and in the end other, more traditional techniques were used by politics in Manchester and elsewhere in 2011. The outlawing of facemasks or hoodies was considered in the wake of the riots, and the chapter ends by exploring the wider issues of the concealment and redacting of the face, through the 2007 Manu Luksch film Faceless, and the assumption of facelessness or bare life in the body politic of the riot, where both rioters and police are masked. Deleuze and Guattari claim that the face is a politics; dismantling or effacing the face, like defacing property in a riot, may constitute another politics. The chapter explores whether an alternative politics is indeed being performed here and what form of politics it might be. en
dc.format.extent 20 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartof International Politics and Performance en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Interventions en
dc.rights en
dc.title Facing and Defacing en
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontobookanthology/chapter en
dc.contributor.institution Department of International Politics en


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