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dc.contributor.author McInnes, Colin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-22T18:52:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-22T18:52:01Z
dc.date.issued 2015-11-06
dc.identifier.citation McInnes , C 2015 , ' WHO's Next : Changing authority in global health governance after Ebola ' International Affairs , vol. 91 , no. 6 , pp. 1299-1316 . https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2346.12454 en
dc.identifier.issn 0020-5850
dc.identifier.other PURE: 6252671
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: d69022af-fb25-4516-aa2e-2429b2754821
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84953931604
dc.identifier.other handle.net: 2160/36387
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0003-3611-6454/work/56162959
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/36387
dc.description Accepted for publication in November 2015 special issue on the United Nations at 70. en
dc.description.abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) occupies a central place in the system of global health governance and plays a key role in the control of epidemics and pandemics. The 2014 Ebola crisis in West Africa, however, saw widespread and sustained criticism of its performance, leading many to call for its reform and even replacement. This article moves on from initial analyses of the WHO’s ‘failure’, to argue that the crisis has led to a shift in its authority as a global governor. It argues that the WHO’s traditional basis of authority was largely expert and delegated - that it provided technical advice and normative guidance, and that its authority was 'on loan' from member states, who exerted considerable influence over the WHO. Its actions during the West African Ebola outbreak remained consistent with this, but were unable to cope with what the outbreak required. The criticisms both of the WHO and the wider system of global health governance, however, have opened up a space where the balance of authority is shifting to one based more heavily on capacity - the ability to act in a crisis. If such a shift is realised, it will create different expectations of the WHO which, if they are not fulfilled, may lead to trust in the Organisation reducing and its legitimacy being compromised. en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof International Affairs en
dc.rights en
dc.subject WHO en
dc.subject Ebola en
dc.subject Global health governance en
dc.subject Social Sciences(all) en
dc.title WHO's Next : Changing authority in global health governance after Ebola en
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontojournal/article en
dc.description.version authorsversion en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2346.12454
dc.contributor.institution Department of International Politics en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.date.embargoedUntil 06-11-20


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