Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Dash, Chloe Gisela Jane
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-04T13:41:58Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-04T13:41:58Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/42809
dc.description.abstract This study explores the representation of bias in social tags and Library of Congress Subject Headings, with a particular focus on the motivations of the layperson (the tagger) and the expert (the cataloguer). A mixed methodological approach was adopted. A framework for measuring bias was defined and constructed and this was applied via a simple coding scheme to a total of 500 social tags from LibraryThing and 175 Library of Congress Subject Headings from the Library of Congress online catalogue. These were harvested from a sample of 50 popular feminist fiction titles. The analysis demonstrated that, although there were a higher proportion of unbiased social tags than unbiased LCSH, issues of bias were found in both systems. The two systems displayed very distinct issues of bias, given the differing motivations of the tagger (personal) and the cataloguer (to allow subject access). The research demonstrated the idea that the concepts of bias and interpretation are inseparable; and (regardless of system and language), one cannot interpret anything without applying personal, cultural and leaned biases based on a particular worldview. en_GB
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher Aberystwyth University en_GB
dc.title A matter of context: an investigation into the representaion of bias in social tags and Library of Congress Subject Headings en_GB
dc.type Thesis en_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevel taught masters en
dc.type.publicationtype thesis or dissertation en


Files in this item

Aside from theses and in the absence of a specific licence document on an item page, all works in Cadair are accessible under the CC BY-NC-ND Licence. AU theses and dissertations held on Cadair are made available for the purposes of private study and non-commercial research and brief extracts may be reproduced under fair dealing for the purpose of criticism or review. If you have any queries in relation to the re-use of material on Cadair, contact is@aber.ac.uk.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Cadair


Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics