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dc.contributor.author O'Hanlon, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Read, Jenny
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-19T14:27:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-19T14:27:34Z
dc.date.issued 2017-09-01
dc.identifier.citation O'Hanlon , C & Read , J 2017 , ' Blindness to background: An inbuilt bias for visual objects ' Developmental Science , vol. 20 , no. 5 , e12478 . https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12478 en
dc.identifier.issn 1363-755X
dc.identifier.other PURE: 9649080
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: fe7912d2-e2b1-4afe-9253-f0d45ea89ec0
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 85005976158
dc.identifier.other PubMed: 27873433
dc.identifier.other handle.net: 2160/43924
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/43924
dc.description.abstract Sixty-eight 2- to 12-year-olds and 30 adults were shown colorful displays on a touchscreen monitor and trained to point to the location of a named color. Participants located targets near-perfectly when presented with four abutting colored patches. When presented with three colored patches on a colored background, toddlers failed to locate targets in the background. Eye tracking demonstrated that the effect was partially mediated by a tendency not to fixate the background. However, the effect was abolished when the targets were named as nouns, whilst the change to nouns had little impact on eye movement patterns. Our results imply a powerful, inbuilt tendency to attend to objects, which may slow the development of color concepts and acquisition of color words. en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Developmental Science en
dc.rights en
dc.subject Psychology(all) en
dc.title Blindness to background: : An inbuilt bias for visual objects en
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontojournal/article en
dc.description.version authorsversion en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12478
dc.contributor.institution Department of Psychology en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.date.embargoedUntil 04-07-20


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