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dc.contributor.author Corton, John
dc.contributor.author Donnison, Iain
dc.contributor.author Patel, Manisha
dc.contributor.author Bühle, Lutz
dc.contributor.author Hodgson, Edward
dc.contributor.author Wachendorf, Michael
dc.contributor.author Bridgwater, Anthony
dc.contributor.author Allison, Gordon
dc.contributor.author Fraser, Mariecia
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-19T15:06:41Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-19T15:06:41Z
dc.date.issued 2016-09-01
dc.identifier.citation Corton , J , Donnison , I , Patel , M , Bühle , L , Hodgson , E , Wachendorf , M , Bridgwater , A , Allison , G & Fraser , M 2016 , ' Expanding the biomass resource : Sustainable oil production via fast pyrolysis of low input high diversity biomass and the potential integration of thermochemical and biological conversion routes ' Applied Energy , vol. 177 , pp. 852-862 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.05.088 en
dc.identifier.issn 0306-2619
dc.identifier.other PURE: 7801924
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: d276b639-af9b-4835-9253-dc8dd81ae7af
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84973861919
dc.identifier.other PubMed: 27818570
dc.identifier.other PubMedCentral: PMC5070406
dc.identifier.other handle.net: 2160/43945
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0002-9575-8839/work/61835560
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0003-3999-1270/work/61835812
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/43945
dc.description Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBS/E/W/10963A01); en
dc.description.abstract Waste biomass is generated during the conservation management of semi-natural habitats, and represents an unused resource and potential bioenergy feedstock that does not compete with food production. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to characterise a representative range of biomass generated during conservation management in Wales. Of the biomass types assessed, those dominated by rush (Juncus effuses) and bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) exhibited the highest and lowest volatile compositions respectively and were selected for bench scale conversion via fast pyrolysis. Each biomass type was ensiled and a sub-sample of silage was washed and pressed. Demineralization of conservation biomass through washing and pressing was associated with higher oil yields following fast pyrolysis. The oil yields were within the published range established for the dedicated energy crops miscanthus and willow. In order to examine the potential a multiple output energy system was developed gross power production estimates following valorisation of the press fluid, char and oil. If used in multi fuel industrial burners the char and oil alone would displace 3.9 x 105 tonnes per year of No. 2 light oil using Welsh biomass from conservation management. Bioenergy and product development using these feedstocks could simultaneously support biodiversity management and substitute for fossil fuels, thereby reducing GHG emissions. Gross power generation predictions show good potential. en
dc.format.extent 11 en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Applied Energy en
dc.rights en
dc.subject fast pyrolysis en
dc.subject low input high density en
dc.subject conservation biomass en
dc.subject integrated processing en
dc.subject rush en
dc.subject bracken en
dc.subject bio oil en
dc.title Expanding the biomass resource : Sustainable oil production via fast pyrolysis of low input high diversity biomass and the potential integration of thermochemical and biological conversion routes en
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontojournal/article en
dc.description.version publishersversion en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.05.088
dc.contributor.institution Department of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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