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dc.contributor.author Griffiths, Hywel Meilyr
dc.contributor.author Salisbury, Eurig
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-13T04:09:14Z
dc.date.available 2013-07-13T04:09:14Z
dc.date.issued 2013-04
dc.identifier.citation Griffiths , H M & Salisbury , E 2013 , ' The tears I shed were Noah’s flood: medieval genre, floods and the fluvial landscape in the poetry of Guto’r Glyn ' Journal of Historical Geography , vol 40 , pp. 94–104 . DOI: 10.1016/j.jhg.2012.11.008 en
dc.identifier.issn 0305-7488
dc.identifier.other PURE: 827289
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 688fc9d4-32f0-4537-a7f9-b6aff843d624
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84875803475
dc.identifier.other handle.net: 2160/9063
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2160/9063
dc.description.abstract This paper presents an analysis of the poetry of Guto'r Glyn, one of the most prominent Welsh poets of the medieval period, in order to gain an insight into medieval Welsh society's perception of the fluvial environment and ways in which it appropriated rivers and floods for cultural purposes. Rivers and watercourses were used by poets for a wide variety of different purposes and in many different genres. It is shown that their use in elegies was spearheaded by Guto'r Glyn, who named specific rivers in the context of grief and sorrow and furthered his use of this elegiac topos in his poems of compassion. Rivers were an integral part of a complex cultural landscape of topos and genre and were linked both to Biblical deluges and to myths of submersion. Floodplains were important sites of creativity as well as sites of settlement, cultivation and travel. Such responses point to a cultural heterogeneity that has previously been identified as an important factor in determining the relationship between society and nature. In a future in which the operation of societies on floodplains is likely to be impacted by climate change, such subtle cultural differences may influence the way in which they adapt. It is argued that analysis of historical cultural attitudes to the fluvial landscape, in which extreme events sometimes occurred, may provide evidence of such adaptation and resilience by societies of the past. en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Historical Geography en
dc.rights en
dc.subject Wales en
dc.subject Welsh en
dc.subject Poetry en
dc.subject Floods en
dc.subject Environmental history en
dc.subject Medieval en
dc.title The tears I shed were Noah’s flood: medieval genre, floods and the fluvial landscape in the poetry of Guto’r Glyn en
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontojournal/article en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhg.2012.11.008
dc.contributor.institution Department of Geography and Earth Sciences en
dc.contributor.institution Department of Welsh and Celtic Studies en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en


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